Nick Saban Has Nothing to Prove to High School Coaches

Louisiana high school football coaches have had a busy few weeks. First, there was the on-again/off-again boycott of Ed Orgeron’s LSU football program. Then, Parkway High School football coach, David Feaster, went nuclear when he banned Nick Saban and Alabama from his program. The tense situation between the New Orleans high schools and Ed Orgeron was quickly smoothed over. As for Feaster and Saban? Feaster soon found himself on the unemployment line as Parkway principal Waylon Bates fired the coach.

Feaster didn’t agree with what he considered to be Saban’s unethical recruiting tactics. The former Parkway head coach took particular issue with how Saban recruited Brandon Harris in the 2014 recruiting class.

Harris was a highly regarded dual-threat quarterback in that 2014 recruiting class. Alabama’s offensive assistant coaches believed that Harris would be a valuable asset to the Alabama offense. But no matter how good a recruit is, they don’t truly have an offer from Alabama until Saban says they have an offer from Alabama. For that to happen, Harris would need to attend a Crimson Tide football camp to prove himself to Saban.

Saban’s record at Alabama speaks for itself. The way in which he structures his recruiting process may seem harsh to some, but that structure has proven results. If you’re in charge of a high school program, you’re wise to play by Saban’s rules. If you don’t, it’s not going to harm Saban. It’s only going to be to the detriment of your high school recruits.

Now, as for Harris, his time as an LSU Tiger was anything but extraordinary. His career in Baton Rouge was spent between riding Les Miles’ bench and starting. He was ultimately benched in favor of Purdue transfer Danny Etling. Based on this, I’d say that Saban was correct to pass on the previously highly regarded quarterback recruit. Saban continues to sit on top of the SEC while Miles found himself fired mid-season.

There is a bigger picture in all of this. Those Louisiana football coaches were wrong for leading an albeit short boycott of LSU and Feaster was wrong for banning Alabama from his former program. Who high school recruits show interest in and where those recruits end up playing their college ball is up to the players. End of story.

These high school coaches can offer advice to their players but that’s where it has to end. Unless the college coaches who are recruiting the players are doing something illegal, they should be granted access to the recruits. If the recruit wants nothing to do with a particular college program, that’s their call. Otherwise, the only thing that these high school coaches are doing is limiting the potential opportunities for the recruits. And limiting the opportunities of the recruits is the last thing a high school coach should be doing.

Perhaps if Feaster would have given Saban the benefit of the doubt, Harris’ collegiate career would look considerably better than it does. Just imagine if Harris would have attended the Alabama camp, been offered a scholarship by Saban and enrolled at Alabama rather than LSU. A large part of the reason Miles was fired by LSU was due to his inability to develop a quarterback. And a large part of Saban’s success is his ability to develop a college level quarterback and place that quarterback in the best position to win.

Saban continues to win. Harris is looking to transfer. Miles is sitting at home. And Feaster was fired for what was considered to be insubordination.

 

E-mail Seth at  or follow him on Twitter @SethMerenbloom.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

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